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Old 11-09-2021, 08:25 PM   #1
VolvoScout
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Default Camshaft Oil Seals

Replaced the front camshaft oil seal (genuine Volvo) on a B230F while doing the timing belt last week.

Just noticed today that it is leaking.

I'm assuming it's not evenly set.

What's the best procedure for pressing these into place?
Is there a proper tool to use?
I tried pressing it in by hand, but it was too tight, so I gently tapped it into place with the back (flat side) of a drill bit and a hammer.

Will pressing these in too deeply cause a leak?

Is it possible to change the front seal without having to redo the engine timing?

Also, what is the change interval for the rear cam seal? (Car has 91k miles)
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Old 11-09-2021, 08:41 PM   #2
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It could be not evenly set or not pushed in far enough. Do you remember how far you set it? Timing belt has to come off because you have to remove the pulley and rear timing cover.
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Old 11-09-2021, 08:49 PM   #3
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Here's the install depth
[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 11-09-2021, 09:00 PM   #4
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That’s perfect. You may have knocked the spring off when installing the seal. I use a 1 3/8 inch socket with a big washer and a long bolt to install those. The socket pushes the seal right into place as the bolt threads into the end of the shaft.

Last edited by 2manyturbos; 11-09-2021 at 09:06 PM..
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Old 11-09-2021, 09:01 PM   #5
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Bottom left of the cam seal…maybe it’s lighting but it looks like the lip of the seal is flipped or torn.
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Old 11-09-2021, 09:07 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolvolvo View Post
Bottom left of the cam seal…maybe it’s lighting but it looks like the lip of the seal is flipped or torn.
I think you may be right, on closer inspection it does look like it flipped during the install...dang.

Any recommended method to prevent the seal from flipping during installation?

[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 11-09-2021, 09:46 PM   #7
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Not that everyone has these lying around, I used the a 240 strut cap as it was pretty much the perfect diameter for the crankshaft and intermediate shaft seals. If you can't locate a suitable tool to seat the seal, you can use the old seal to install the new one.



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Old 11-09-2021, 11:25 PM   #8
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There is a tool available.

https://www.toolsource.com/volvo-too...-p-233732.html

Works well. The problem is if you aren't paying attention (like I was), you can push the seal in too deep or roll the lip over and it will leak.

There was a guy (RobertDIY) on YouTube who had a homemade tool that he would sell. That one worked much better. You could set the seal on the tool and check to make sure the lip didn't roll over.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tKmo...nnel=RobertDIY

That video is for the front crank seal, but he had a similar tool for the camshaft and intermediate shaft
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Last edited by billkaz; 11-09-2021 at 11:29 PM.. Reason: Wrong Linko
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Old 11-10-2021, 12:09 AM   #9
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Theoretically, would the use of a PVC sleeve (or similar) with an inside diameter to match the outside diameter of the cam, help prevent the seal from rolling over/flipping?

How deep is too deep for setting the seal?
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Old 11-10-2021, 03:22 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VolvoScout View Post
Any recommended method to prevent the seal from flipping during installation?
First, I'd get that brown staining off the cam snout. Looks like surface rust, or maybe just old dried oil, but it's not as smooth as it could be. Generic pot scrubbing pad, or 1000-2000 sandpaper should make it shiny-clean. Make sure to wipe any abrasive grit out of the hole when you're done. Fresh oil or light grease on the snout and the inner surface of the seal, so it can slide on without grabbing.

Quote:
How deep is too deep for setting the seal?
Just past where the seal is now, you'll see a rough hole that looks like a casting flaw. It's actually a drain so oil pressure won't blow the seal out. Don't cover the hole. Where it is now is about right... just at the end of the chamfered edge.
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Old 11-10-2021, 10:00 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VolvoScout View Post
Theoretically, would the use of a PVC sleeve (or similar) with an inside diameter to match the outside diameter of the cam, help prevent the seal from rolling over/flipping?
Nope just lube it up real good like MasterBlaster suggested
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Old 11-10-2021, 12:17 PM   #12
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Just to add - Volvo made a later tool that pressed into the new seal, moving the lip out of the way to prevent any chance of rolling the seal lip. I can add pics of that tool for reference. Any tube that matches the OD of the seal will work, so the load is not on the flat of the seal, just a question of going slow so you maintain the even & level placement as you press it in place.

As said, the new seal needs to be evenly seated just below the inner chamfered edge, not recessed deeply like Polaris's intermediate seal, for example
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Old 11-10-2021, 12:31 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polaris View Post
Not that everyone has these lying around, I used the a 240 strut cap as it was pretty much the perfect diameter for the crankshaft and intermediate shaft seals. If you can't locate a suitable tool to seat the seal, you can use the old seal to install the new one.
I use the same nut.
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Old 11-10-2021, 02:13 PM   #14
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The tool from Volvo is only about $45 and if you see yourself doing this job again. It's worth it to have the correct tool.
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Old 11-10-2021, 03:39 PM   #15
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Do you have a link to the official Volvo tool or the part number?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dl242gt View Post
The tool from Volvo is only about $45 and if you see yourself doing this job again. It's worth it to have the correct tool.
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Old 11-10-2021, 04:35 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polaris View Post
Not that everyone has these lying around, I used the a 240 strut cap as it was pretty much the perfect diameter for the crankshaft and intermediate shaft seals. If you can't locate a suitable tool to seat the seal, you can use the old seal to install the new one.
Crank gear also works. I use an old one with the nub broken off.
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Old 11-10-2021, 04:50 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VolvoScout View Post
Do you have a link to the official Volvo tool or the part number?
The part number for the tool is 9995025. It looks like Volvo discontinued the tool but Skandix says they have 9 of them in stock.

https://www.tascaparts.com/oem-parts...s-tool-9995025

https://www.skandix.de/en/spare-part...1033633/?dc=33
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